Tag Archives: Langer

Mindlessness and the Riots

In this post, Meg Barker writes about the Summer 2011 UK riots and mindfulness:

Following the news reports over the last few days I, like many people, have struggled over what, if any, response I can make that would be useful. As the rioting and looting which started in Tottenham spread across London and then to other large cities, it became clear that something complex was happening which could not be wrapped up in any singular, generalised, explanation. Even as a social psychologist, I don’t feel that I know enough about all the economic, social and political aspects of the situation to comment wisely about this. Similarly, I can’t claim enough understanding of how the current circumstances are playing out through the experience of those directly involved to talk in anything other than a patronising way about what this might feel like on an individual level.

So what can I offer? In the news reporting, one word has jumped out at me time and time again, and that is ‘mindless’. As an article in the New Statesman pointed out, this is the ‘explanatory cliché’ that politicians and journalists are constantly falling back on: ‘”mindless acts of violence and destruction” and “mindless criminality” carried out by “mindless thugs”‘.

As someone who is currently writing a book about mindfulness, mindlessness does seem like something that I am knowledgeable enough to comment upon, so here are my thoughts.

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