Tag Archives: practice

5 steps to mindfulness

Here’s a link to a great introductory post by Thich Nhat Hanh about 5 steps towards being mindful.

1. Mindful breathing

2. Concentration

3. Awareness of the body

4. Releasing tension

5. Walking meditation

New podcast by Martine Batchelor

There’s a great new podcast by Martine Batchelor out. Follow the link.

Details from the website: Martine Batchelor was a nun in a Korean Buddhist monastery for 10 years, where she followed a traditional path of practice and exploration. We speak about her journey in becoming a nun, what the rhythms of that life were like, what practices she undertook, and how she came to integrate, and deepen, the understanding she uncovered during her decade of training there.

The episode concludes with a compelling conversation about the multi-perspectival nature of human beings, and how we’re constantly practicing at a crossroads between various aspects of our lives.

This is part 1 of a two-part series.

Mindfulness: It ain’t what you do it’s the way that you do it

In this post, Meg Barker considers the possibilities for mindfulness in everyday life.

I’ve been interested in mindfulness for several years now and will be writing a book about it in the next year or so, building on the chapter that I wrote for the OU counselling module.

Mindfulness is the big idea in counselling and psychology at the moment. The ‘gold standard’ of counselling – cognitive-behavioural therapy – is turning to mindfulness as its ‘third wave’. If you go to a mental health services it is likely that they will offer some kind of mindfulness trainingSelf help books for depression and anxiety are increasingly mindfulness focused.

One conclusion that I have come to is that there is no such thing as an inherently mindful or non-mindful activity. People (including myself at times) often have the idea that only certain activities could be mindful: like meditating, walking in the countryside, perhaps painting or other such tranquil pursuits. There is definitely a notion that certain activities are anti-mindful, including things like watching TV, commuting or social-networking. As with the idea that you are doing meditation wrong if you don’t have a completely ’empty mind’ I think this is a misconception which isn’t helpful and which often leads people to beating themselves up that they aren’t doing mindfulness properly (which really defeats the purpose!) Just as you can sit in meditation without being mindful at all, I think you can also be mindful as you are texting or surfing the internet.

Here I want to say what I think mindfulness is and why it is all about the way you approach activities, not the activity itself.

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